Living Will Templates

It’s always best to put things in place for the future rather than coming to regret not taking action later. Whilst most people of a certain age or above have a will in place, not so many have documented what their wishes would be should they lose the ability to speak for themselves. A living will is designed to take care of this and means that your family and healthcare team will know what to do if you ever lose the capacity to speak. The UK Living Will Registry are here to help you produce a living will. No Ambiguity Living wills feature a legally-binding part which is known as an Advance Decision. In this section, you can inform others whether you would like to have your life prolonged or not if your health ever does deteriorate irreversibly. You can change your living will as many times as you like. The experienced professionals at the UK Living Will can guide you through every part of the process, ensuring that your wishes are granted if you can no longer communicate at any point. Clear up future confusion about your wishes by getting in touch with them today. Head to the website to find out...

Death can come suddenly,

but there are ways you can prepare far in advance to make things bearable for your family Death isn’t the best conversation starter. But, it could be the most important talk of your life. Prepare for death by creating a Living Will with the UK Living Will Registry. It might help your family avoid crisis. Further Reading...

Too few making last will and testament

The subject of death remains a taboo for most people, not just from a cultural perspective but also because dealing with the impending death of a loved one is a challenging proposition. Nonetheless, with recent reports of unexpected accidents and occurrences such as flight MH370, it is perhaps a better option to be prepared for unexpected deaths. An unexpected death without a will invariably causes hardship, especially when the deceased was the main breadwinner of the family. Having a will alleviates the strain on dependants who are already distressed by the passing of their loved one.   Further Reading...

Lessons from the USA

being prepared for the final days We can’t know for sure when the end will come – but at least we can be prepared. La Crosse is a lively Mississippi River town that talks a lot about death. At last count, 96 percent of the people who passed away here had created advance directives. “It makes sense to me,” said one man, “because I want to have my family know my last wishes and exactly what they need to do, and not have to worry about agonizing over that decision if something happens.” Bud Hammes is a medical ethicist who started the program called “Respecting Choices” 20 years ago, after seeing firsthand what death was like without it. “I found a situation where the young doctors in particular were expressing to me their distress about having to treat patients who were critically ill, many of them quite elderly, and not knowing whether it was what the patient would or would not want,” said Hammes. “Perhaps the saddest thing I witnessed was to see families ripped apart by this disagreement – ‘You murdered Mom’ kind of feelings.” Another key point is that patients at the end of their lives often choose to forego efforts to extend their lives at all costs. That translates into shorter, less expensive stays in the hospital; particularly important in countries with increasingly stretched healthcare budgets. &nbsp; <strong>Further Reading</strong> <a href=”http://www.cbsnews.com/news/being-prepared-for-the-final-days/” target=”_blank”>http://www.cbsnews.com/news/being-prepared-for-the-final-days/</a>...

Are there Circumstances where I would not want to be kept alive

• Do not start or continue life-sustaining procedures if my condition is unlikely to improve and I am not expected to return to full independent functional capacity. • I believe that in general life is worth living, even in conditions of debilitation or pain. However, I also believe that God does not require me to cling to the mere appearance of life in all circumstances, regardless of the impossibility or extreme unlikelihood of any meaningful recovery of consciousness. For this reason, I DO NOT want to be reclaimed from death or kept alive by artificial means if the likely result is that I then will “live” in a brain-dead state, or in a permanent vegetative state or permanent coma. • I fear being kept “alive” by medical means after my God-ordained time to die has come. Therefore I do not want to be subjected to the use of artificial treatments that give me the mere appearance of life. If I am “brain-dead” or permanently comatose or in a persistent vegetative state, such that only my base automatic functions are medically sustainable, I wish to be allowed to die, free of machines or other intrusive devices or life-sustaining methods. • I know that there are many “gray areas” in end-of-life decision-making. I also know that I cannot anticipate all the possible dilemmas that my decision maker(s) might face. All I ask is that you do your best to figure out what I would want under the circumstances. Thank...